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Mental health around food

person holding note with be kind text

I am writing this blog as an addition to my last podcast episode #20 foodshaming. If you haven’t checked that one out, please do. This is going to be a short blog dear, so my apologies if you were expecting a long one. Food is what unite people and not only at parties or the choices we make around food. Even the problems that we face around food unites us. But somehow in society, they divided us…

I have been helping people with weight loss, weight gain, eating disorders and gaining back their periods. All these people face similair problems. Too much movement, low calorie diets, a lot of stress around food, lost a lot of weight or gained a lot of weight back again. Can’t stop binging, restriction from certain foods and so on!

We learned from society that these groups have certain looks, a certain weight and a certain sets of problems. But that is not the case! A person that is overweight also can have habits of restricting and purging, a person who has an eating disorder and relapses faces the same as a person that lose weight and relapses.

We should take each other problems serious and we should be kind to each other. Otherwise, no improvements can be made on all the sides. Be kind and try nog to judge someone situation. And don’t forget for yourself. Your current situation is not your final destination.

Yours,

Queeny

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Why your eating disorder is a coping mechanism

Dear readers,

Your eating disorder is a coping mechanism. There I said it and I bet that you may have heard that before. Either in therapy or some other blog you read. It’s a good thing to understand as a person suffering from an eating disorder that this is the case for you. But also for people who are trying to help you (dietitian and general practitioners).

Maybe it’s a good thing to define the word coping first, because we all use it so easy. So in the Cambridge dictionary coping is defined as ‘to deal successfully with a difficult situation‘. There is something damn funny about this definition. Because most people who have healthy coping habits, can successfully deal with difficult situations. But if you choose your self destructing habits, you can often fool yourself that this is the right thing to do.

EVERYONE HAS SELF-DESTRUCTING HABITS!

the thing is, they come in different sizes.┬áBut you can choose to use them or to let them be. You do not always need to do what your thoughts tell you to do. For thousands of years eating disorders have been around. Princes Sissi and the Swedish princes Victoria had them and there’s is nothing to be ashamed about. You should however be active in teaching yourself better coping mechanisms. Here’s a list with bad types of coping. The assignment for you is to see which one or ones you use and be creative with replacing them with new coping ways.

For example: I always smoke when I am nervous > coping is smoking > If I am nervous I will do a little sprint of 30 seconds to relive the tension.

Bad coping mechanism:

  • smoking
  • drinking alcohol
  • drinking fizzy drinks
  • chewing gum
  • too much exercise
  • cutting yourself
  • not eating or little eating
  • eating way too much
  • eating lollipops or having toothpicks in your mouth non-stop.

Not everyone with these coping mechanisms have eating disorders. But it all comes down to one thing: FACE WHAT YOU FEEL.

Hope this helps,

Queeny